Theolene Swanson née Moen

Minnesota Historical Society Death Records

Swanson, Theolene M.
Certificate Number: 1962-MN-007453
Death: December 24, 1962
County of Death: Hennepin County, Minnesota
Mother’s Maiden Name: PERUS
Date of Birth: Jun 6 1873
Place of Birth: MINNESOTA

According to an unverified family tree, Theolene was born in Houston, Minnesota. She was married to Abraham David Swanson also of Houston and had five sons, some born in Minnesota and at least one, Russel (Roy), born in Swanson, Saskatchewan.

On Roy’s birth certificate in 1910, her name seems to be spelled Theoline.

Some time after Abraham’s death in 1912 (?), Theolene and other family members moved to Minneapolis, Minnesota.

In front: Theolene Swanson (née Moen) and Roy (Russel?) Albert.
Behind: Grant (1906-1962), Clarence (1904-1943), Selmer (1898-1985), Telford (1902-?)
Isabel & Mother (Theolene) | Clossett Print
Theolene, Roy, Clarence ?, Telford ? and two children. Minneapolis.
Back: Taken 4/29/28 [?]
Telford and Theolene

So-called God

D'un bond prodigieux Henrik s'élance vers la corde

We were relieved to hear that another particular god is dead. We heard it in the howl of the banshee, calling shipwrecked sailors to their doom. I who had the ears that let me hear remember grandpa saying, any dead god is a good god. Said they all eventually go down the pike to the home for the ungodly, where they enjoy a generous retirement package. 

Feat of Balancing on Chairs

Feat of balancing on chairs

Among the numerous physical exercises is the feat of balancing on the two rear legs of a chair while one foot rests on the front part of the seat and the other on the back of the chair. This may appear to be a hard thing to do, yet with a little practice it may be accomplished. This exercise is one of many practiced by the boys of a boys’ home for an annual display given by them. A dozen of the boys will mount chairs at the same time and keep them in balance at the word of a commanding officer.

The Boy Mechanic, vol 1.

How to Make Skating Shoes

Skating shoes

Remove the clamp part, as shown in Fig. 1, from an ordinary clamp skate. Drill holes in the top part of the skate for screws. Purchase a pair of high shoes with heavy soles and fasten the skates to the soles with screws, as shown in Fig. 2. When completed the skating shoes will have the appearance shown on Fig. 3. These will make as good skating shoes as can be purchased, and very much cheaper. 

—Contributed by Wallace C. Newton, Leominster, Mass.

The Boy Mechanic

Trap for Small Animals

Trap for small animals

This is a box trap with glass sides and back, the panes of glass being held in place by brads placed on both sides. The animal does not fear to enter the box, because he can see through it: when he enters, however, and touches the bait the lid is released and, dropping, shuts him in. This is one of the easiest traps to build and is usually successful.

The Boy Mechanic

Small Electrical Hydrogen Generator

A small hydrogen generator may be made from a fruit jar, A (see sketch), with two tubes, B and C, soldered in the top. The plates E can be made of tin or galvanized iron, and should be separated about 1/8 in. by small pieces of wood. One of these plates is connected to metal top, and the wire from the other passes through the tube B, which is filled with melted rosin or wax, to make it airtight. This wire connects to one side of a battery of two cells, the other wire being soldered to the metal top of the jar, as shown. The jar is partly filled with a very dilute solution of sulphuric acid, about 1 part of acid to 20 of water.

Hydrogen generator

When the current of electricity passes between the plates E, hydrogen gas is generated, which rises and passes through the rubber hose D, into the receiver G. This is a wide-mouth bottle, which is filled with water and inverted over a pan of water, F. The gas bubbling up displaces the water and fills the bottle.

If the receiver is removed when half full of gas, the remaining space will be filled with air, which will mix with the gas and form an explosive mixture. If a lighted match is then held near the mouth of the bottle a sharp report will be heard.If the bottle is fitted with a cork containing two wires nearly touching, and the apparatus connected with an induction coil, in such a manner that a spark will beproduced inside the bottle, the explosion will blowout the cork or possibly break the bottle. Caution should be used to avoid being struck by pieces of flying glass if this experiment is tried, and under no condition should a lighted match or spark be brought near the end of the rubber hose D, as the presence of a little air in the generator will make an explosive mixture which would probably break the jar.

The Boy Mechanic